Appreciating Systems

Appreciating Systems for Genuine Efficiency
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D x V x F > R and the Stages of #Change

July 4th, 2011 Posted in Change Tags: , , ,

Reading again about this formula for change, it occurred to me that there’s a strong parallel with the stages of changes I recently posted about.

The formula goes this way: D x V x F > R where

  • D = Dissatisfaction with current situation
  • V = Vision for a preferred future as compared to current situation
  • F = First steps to do to start the change
  • R = natural Resistance to change

So, for any change to occur, all elements needs to be superior to zero or the change will simply not be possible.

The link I did with Stages of Change is in the order of the factors in the formula. Indeed, the initial stages of changes are:

  • Pre-contemplation stage where people don’t see any need for a change (= they’re satisfied with current situation)
  • Contemplation stage (people see the need for a change but are ambivalent about changing)
  • Preparation stage (people are committed to changing, but need help in preparing an action plan)

(The other stages are Action, Maintenance and Relapse but relate to the ongoing change or after change has been done).

To each of these stages correspond different strategies to engage people in the change (italic is a quote from Wikipedia)

  • people in the Pre-contemplation stage “typically underestimate the Pros of changing, overestimate the Cons, and often are not aware of making such mistakes. These individuals are encouraged to become more mindful of their decision-making and more conscious of the multiple benefits of changing an unhealthy behavior.” Isn’t this helping them raising their Dissatisfaction with current situation?
  • people in the Contemplation stage “learn about the kind of person they could be if they changed their behavior and learned more from people who behave in healthy ways. They’re encouraged to work at reducing the Cons of changing their behavior.” Isn’t this helping them defining their Vision of a preferred situation?
  • people in the Preparation stage “are encouraged to seek support from friends they trust, tell people about their plan to change the way the act, and think about how they would feel if they behaved in a healthier way. Their number one concern is—when they act, will they fail? They learn that the better prepared they are the more likely they are to keep progressing.” Isn’t this helping them build an Action Plan and First Steps to initiate the change? (with support from relatives)

I don’t know if one author quote the other in these different works, but there are clearly relations between one and the other.

Of course, how to provide that help is what most of this blog is about: explaining, teaching and coaching in various approaches. My last lines of thought clearly are more of the coaching side and raising intrinsic motivation in people, using, for instance, Motivational Interviewing.

Using Motivational Interviewing to elicit change under constraint (#change #lean @biggerplate #mindmap)

I’ve just finished a wonderful ebook on “Motivational Interviewing in Probation” (see my links on my delicious account) and it appeared to me that this skill may very well be suited for Lean Coaches when they don’t have the opportunity to coach top management but are asked to “do Lean” in the company.

Most of the time, managers are asked to “do Lean” and this very request triggers their change resistance upon arrival of the loca Lean expert (coach). As each managers may be on a different stage of the change model (see my previous article on Stages of Change Model), the coach should be addressing each of them differently. This mindmap explains how.

Use your new MI skills to achieve that and tell me how it works. Warning: it may look easy, but it’s some hard and live intellectual work. But who said Lean was easy anyway? 🙂

See the uploaded MI on Probation mindmap on Biggerplate here.

Considering #AppreciativeInquiry to lead #change in your organization? Have TWO #mindmap summaries at hands reach! (@biggerplate)

Ok I think the title’s saying it all.

The first map is a summary of the 5D process.

For a more detailed explanation of what AI is, you might then have a look at the mindmap I did of the excellent book “The Power of Appreciative Inquiry” by Diana Whitney and Amanda Trosten-Bloom (not replacing the book of course!)

 

Chris Argyris Theory of Action (a #mindmap uploaded to @biggerplate)

June 23rd, 2011 Posted in Change Tags: , , , ,

Ok, I had those on my hard disk, only decided to prettify them and share them.

Chris Argyris has a very interesting explanation of why people don’t change and don’t challenge organizational status quo. you can read more on him on Infed.org (great site by the way, check it out!).

You can also access the just uploaded mindmap: http://www.biggerplate.com/mindmaps/6Pomcg7J/chris-argyris-theory-of-action.

Enjoy!

Nice website about #Deming : DemingCollaboration.com (#lean #systemsthinking #change)

I’ve stumbled on this nice websiote with lots of advocacy for Deming’s work (yes, the quality movement initiator). Have a look at www.demingcollaboration.com.

Moreover, the site also makes the link with Lean and Systems Thinking and advocates for a change in management techniques.

Have a good reading!

When is the last time you reflected on your own management behaviors?

Increasing your change management skills with Motivational Interviewing (a new #mindmap on @biggerplate)

I just uploaded this mindmap on BiggerPlate here.

MI is an ecological way to elicit change motivation and action in people that may have been resisting it in the first place. A perfect skill to master, IMHO, for any change leader or change agent (including Lean management!).

Best of all, it fits very well with Solution Focus, as I have already said previously.

What have you done recently to help people around you accept change?

Redirecting attention from negative to positive in 3 small steps (P->C->O) (a @doingwhatworks blogpost, useful for #Lean change?)

Another great article from Coert Visser about overcoming the so-called “resistance to change”:

Doing What Works in Solution-Focused Change: Redirecting attention from negative to positive in 3 small steps (P->C->O).

Often, a Lean program (or any change program for that matter) is being imposed on people by upper management. Hopefully, most of the time, management asks what need to be achieved, but not necessarily how it needs to be done.

That P>C>O method looks useful when people don’t want the change being imposed on them (Lean for that matter). It indeed means that they want something to change: the contraint being imposed on them!

So that a nice way to reframe their “resistance” and transform it into something they want more of.

As I’ve read elsewhere on contrained change: rather than work on the imposed change when the person needing to change does not want to, work on the contraint itself: “what can we do to get some relief from this imposed changed on you?”.

And then the talk can go into another direction.

 

“The collapse of belief” a #systemsthinking and mental models explanatory ebook

I’ve stumbled upon this very nice booklet that explains all that there is to know about mental models or beliefs: how they constrain us, how they are difficult to identify and how we can change them or just get rid of them.

A very nice read for anybody in the change business (Lean, Appreciative Inquiry, Solution Focus, Systems Thinking…)

“The Collapse of Belief – Rethinking Your Thinking Within a Different Tomorrow” by Kurt and Barbara Hanks.

Through what lens (belief) do you see the world?

Can #Lean be helped by Self-Determination Theory and #SolutionFocus? (a @doingwhatworks paper)

From that very interesting (as is most often the case from Coert Visser!) paper here, I derive the following insights:

Lean on the motivation continuum

Self -Determination Theory (SDT) has is that motivation can be expressed on a continuum from “amotivation” to “intrinsic motivation” with three basic human needs: autonomy, competence and relatedness (all things that are also found in Maslow‘s hierarchy of needs and the notion of Flow from Mihaly_Csikszentmihalyi).

Lean appears to be well on these three pillars of motivation:

  • autonomy is high in an environment where management does not solve the problem of their collaborators, but instead coach them to resolution.
  • this coaching leads to increased competence on the work and on the process of continuous improvement itself, along with a better knowledge of how the organization works (through A3 problem solving for instance which fosters nemawashi – japanese term for: go see all stakeholders and work with them)
  • by doing nemawashi with all stakeholders, people get their relatedness level increased!

On motivating people to do Lean

Visser’s paper continues, on page 13, on the way Motivational Interviewing can help a professionnal helper (!) with their client, as would be the case of a Lean coach in any organization (please bear in mind that I talk of a coach, not a consultant whose approach is different). In this regard, MI is based on 4 general principles:

  • the expression of empathy
  • the development of discrepancy
  • rolling with resistance and
  • support for self-efficacy

Considering what I often saw in organizations with respect to Change and Lean more specifically, I’d say that:

  • Lean change approaches are often law on empathy: “all your problems are belong to us, we’ll you help solve them”,
  • with a development of discrepancy that more than often consist in management or co-called coaches finger pointing faults in those running the processes,
  • a rolling with resistance that consists of stomping it for it’s the proof of ignorance in Lean matters and that so-called Lean coaches and experts know better (which is indeed true as for Lean things, but blatantly false  with respect to people’s own Gemba),
  • and support of efficacy is most of the time seen as Lean consultants (whoops I should have said ‘coaches’ 😉 doing most of the job themselves (deciding on what the Future State Map for instance should look like) with only partial accounting for people’s ideas.

What I described above, though caricatural (or is it?) is still what’s even been given a name: L.A.M.E. (Lean As Misguidedly Executed).

The paper goes on starting from page 14 on some suggested questions to addresse the four principles above to move someone in the needed change direction, but with proper respect for their motivation and of them as people, by helping find how they could be engaged with the change initiative.

Reflection questions:

  • As a CEO, how engaged are your collaborators in the Lean initiative? What have you done to motivate them and engage them, as persons, in it?
  • As a Lean coach, how have you addressed management’s willing to do Lean? What questions did you asked them as for their own needed change with respect to Lean (that is, Lean should be done by management with collaborators, not to collaborators)?


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