Appreciating Systems

Appreciating Systems for Genuine Efficiency
Home » Posts tagged 'appreciative inquiry' (Page 6)

#solutionfocus summary leaflet

I build a leaflet out of public internet information available. Here is the result. Feel free to comment below so that I can improve it!

Solution Focus has a lot in common to Appreciative Inquiry as it is also a strength-based approach.

TRI Solution Focused v1.0 EN

Reblog: Compassionate #Coaching Evokes Better Results | Business News Daily (#appreciativeinquiry)

Here is a very interesting article on BusinessNewsDaily about coaching people for a positive vision, backed with research on brain imagery: Compassionate Coaching Evokes Better Results | Business News Daily.

Coincidentally (or not?), the research was done at Case Western Reserve University, home of Appreciative Inquiry.

Applications in parenting and management is cited in the article.

Donella Meadows: #vision is a necessity before any other #systemsthinking method (sort of #AppreciativeInquiry)

Reading through the Systems Thinking World LinkedIn Group, Gene Bellinger (SystemsWiki owner and group owner) posted the link below to a video of Donella Meadows talking about Vision.

Meadows is a renowned systems thinker whose main work is the “Limits to Growth” book about how our continuing use of non renewable resources will bring a brutal stop to our growth.

In the video posted (http://www.uvm.edu/giee/beyondenvironmentalism/Meadows.mov), Meadows talks about the very importance of always having a vision in mind before trying to do something and how this helped her discover things that she thought she wouldn’t have otherwise. Read more »

What questions do we need to ask to raise awareness of #SystemsThinking?

I recently asked this question on the LinkedIn group Systems Thinking World.

My objective was to try to conduct an Appreciative Inquiry into what works for successfully explaining and making people use Systems Thinking. Few people connected to that initial inquiry, so I went for the question above (blog post title).

I got some interesting answers that I grouped by topic and assembled into a SurveyMonkey survey.

You’re invited to participate in the survey by clicking here.

I plan to publish the results by the beginning of 2011.

Meanwhile, I wish you some happy Christmas and end of year holidays!

Why I think Lean is (also) strength-based

November 10th, 2010 Posted in Appreciative Inquiry, Change, Lean Tags: , ,

A lot of people from the strength movement (Appreciative Inquiry, Solution Focus, etc.) view Lean as a deficit-based only approach to change. I disagree. Or at least I’d like to temper this idea.

Although it’s mainly presented that way in most litterature, I do view it as a very positive approach to change. Only often the positive future is mainly in the senseï‘s head (term for a Lean coach). When “doing Lean” in an organization, what the Lean coach is trying to achieve is have people (and management) make more of what works in other organizations. That’s what so-called “Lean tools” are: demonstrated best practices principles to improve an organization. Management and collaborators should always devise their way of improving their own jobs (because that creates more engagement), it’s sometimes quicker to reuse and adapt best practices that worked elsewhere.

Lean tools (with accompanying management model) are designed to show a gap between what’s wanted (a better view of the future) and what’s currently happening. And this gap may be a deficit OR a strength as reality could be better than what was intended at the beginning. Hence, collaborators have the opportunity to detect strengths and replicate them (we call this “standardize” in Lean terms).

Now I’m not saying Lean isn’t also deficit based. It does look at under-performance and ask collaborators to solve problems but only in order to achieve excellence (very positive vision).

Of course, all that I talked about above is true when Lean is “properly” done, which means that some policy deployment (“hoshin kanri“) has been done and that all collaborators had the opportunity to imagine a better future and ways to achieve it. Though Appreciative Inquiry is not mentioned in that part of Lean, I view policy deployement as a way to Dream about a better future. The Discovery (Inquiry) part may be missing in policy deployment, but it surely is present in day to day operations (or should be, and that’s the role of management of ensuring that both problems AND strengths are discovered – problems get fixed and strengths replicated).

Oh, and strengths (or solutions to problems) need also to be discussed with other team members, so collective inquiry into improving / replicating strengths is indeed present. This is done through creation of “A3” (named after the size of the paper on which that activity is done) where a situation is collectively discussed and ways of improving it (possibly by replicating what others may be already doing) collected and shared.

To end this article, I’d like to advocate people that would like to reinforce the strength-based approach of Lean to participate in the LinkedIn group “Strength-Based Lean Thinking / Six Sigma

AI Design phase is like setting objectives

October 27th, 2010 Posted in Appreciative Inquiry Tags: ,

Being new to AI and from a technical problem solving area (IT engineering), I’ve been struggling a bit around the Design phase. After reading some back issue of the AI Practitioner magazine (wonderful in the high quality of the articles it features!), it stroke me that the Design phase of an AI intervention might be explained as an objectives definition phase.

Of course, it’s far more powerful as any other objectives definition, because it builds on the previous Discovery and Dream steps. I do see them as steps on a stairway, because it allows participants in the AI workshop to be higher than what some other approach would have brought them, in terms of vision and positive hopes.

I’ve feared that when trying to introduce AI to people around me (especially management), they’d see it as some sort of utopian approach. Indeed, there is a logical progression from Discovery of current reality (as appreciatively inquired into its best moments) to Dream of a better future and then a stake in the ground is done of that Dream in the form of the bold and provocative propositions (what needs to be true for the Dream to occur). Then of course, the Destiny/Deliver phase is an action plan to achieve these propositions.

I see AI as a way to reverse cause and effect relationships. One usually live in a world where past and present causes effect a (planned, anticipated) future. Now with AI, envisionned future is not just mental imagery, it’s firmly grounded and, like a lighthouse, attracting us to it. Indeed, the (dreamed of) effect is creating the necessary causes for it to exist.

I might have  summarized too much of the intrinsic magic of the 4D process, but I was not trying to explain the whole AI approach in this article (maybe some other day, and in french as it’s not quite well know here…)

What’s your comments on this?

Change method: Vision, Dialogue, Results

In this very first article, I would like to introduce you to some change methodology that I have encountered while researching the topic on Internet. I find it blissfully simple, yet powerful and embedding concepts that root into strength-based approaches such as Appreciative Inquiry or The World Café.

That “change method”, should we give it a name is based on a simple approach:

  1. Establish a Vision of where you would like the organization to be
  2. Foster a Dialogue of what needs to be done to get to that vision
  3. Promote quick Results to sustain enthusiasm

Vision

By Vision, it is meant a powerful description of a highly desired state to be in. That vision should be given in the present tense, as if it were already attained. I’m not sure the original work I drew this mentioned it (I’ve lost the link), but I must add that a co-created vision seems to be a must. Indeed, a vision decided by top management only can only get you so far: people rarely feel motivated by others’ vision, unless maybe the vision holder is skilled enough to articulate it in vivid language. But the most effective way to transmit a vision is to let people co-build it themselves in their mind.

There are plenty of ways you can find on Internet which may help you co-build a vision. These methods usually also take the next point into consideration by involving the whole system (organization) in the co-design of it and have it emerge from the complexity of all stakeholders being present at the same time. The World Café, Theory U, Appreciative Inquiry just to name a few seem interesting to me!

Dialogue

By Dialogue, we’re referring to an exchange of ideas in the style of David Bohm. That way of exchanging with each others is also mentioned in Peter Senge seminal work on Systems Thinking “The Fifth Discipline”. That kind of Dialogue needs two conditions to occur:

  • deeply listening to others’ ideas to understand them ;
  • suspending one’s own judgement as one could suspend something to a rope, for others to consider and analyse

That way, people are able to non-judmentally consider each others’ opinions and enrich their own by them. There’s respect and humility in this, for sure.

Results

By praising quick results, one encourages the continuation of the work that would lead to realization of the vision. I’d personally link this strength-based approaches (such as Appreciative Inquiry of which I’ll talk more on this blog) which tries to inquire into what works and ways of doing more of it. To prevent exhaustion of people working toward the vision, it is necessary to maintain their enthusiasm, and Vision associated with results is a must for this. Plus, it requires personal involvement of top management for this, which is a motivation in itself for employees.

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