Appreciating Systems

Appreciating Systems for Genuine Efficiency
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10 arguments pour convaincre votre direction …[d]es media sociaux | missphilomene @happy_laurence

December 3rd, 2013 Posted in Uncategorized Tags: , , , , ,

Laurence Vanhee a commis cet excellent article que je vous enjoins de lire immédiatement maintenant tout de suite :

10 arguments pour convaincre votre direction de vous laisser utiliser les media sociaux pendant les heures de bureaux | missphilomene.

C’est direct, fun, 100% pertinent et à appliquer de suite ! Et tellement vrai…

 

 

@NancyDuarte #resonate #free #book on making presentations: what if you could *really* turn your audience into a hero?

I’m reading the beginning of this great book from Nancy Duarte she just released for free in beautiful HTML 5: Resonate. The book’s (or the beginning of it at least) is about the Monomyth as it’s been described by Joseph Campbell in “A Hero’s Journey”.

The purpose of a presentation should be to tell a story and make your audience like it is the hero of it, by making it visualize “what could be” in comparison to “what is“. The intent is to “sell” your proposal of how to achieve the “what could be” part of your message.

Yet, I’m thinking of all these strength-based approaches to change I’ve learned these recent years. For instance:

  • Appreciative Inquiry could be used to have people remember of personal situations where they lived the opposite of the problem (that is a strongly positive situation, that is, an experience of “what could be”). Combined with the social constructionist principle of AI, this could help people co-create their journey rights when you’re presenting (instead of waiting for the “call to action” to start it at the end of the presentation)
  • Solution Focus is explicitly based on the premise that the Future Perfect has already happened, at least partially,and to find again what behavior supported it at that time that could be amplified and done again.

So, instead of just encouraging your audience to just imagine them being a hero, what about having them remember they’ve already been the hero, and probably more than once?

Indeed, the story has already begun albeit in a masqueraded way. The real threshold would then be to have them commit to it and reveal it to the world.

Instead of holding the mirror where the audience can see itself in, what about giving them the mirror to play with? To discover sides of themselves they’ve never imagined they had? And then let them experiment with it right away?

This, I will ponder. I will continue reading the book, because it’s just excellent so far!

 

The Next Wave: how I see the future of #social #networking & blogging on Internet

February 20th, 2013 Posted in Lean, Uncategorized Tags: , , , , , ,

Somesh CirclesThis is something I’ve been pondering since quite some time.

  • Twitter is too short to make for long discourses, and you have to find people, then subscribe to them (not Lean!)
  • Blogs you have to search for and subscribe (not Lean!)
  • #hashtags are a cool way to mark content (so do categories and tags in blog posts)

So here’s what I have in mind for the next wave of social platforms (see picture on the right). It would basically work as this:

  1. people tell the system of what they are interested in using specific #tags
  2. you post whatever interesting content of some kind of a blogging platform and you categorize and #tag your post with as much as necessary #tags your piece of work mandates
  3. the article gets notified to some system: title, @author, all #tags
  4. people who subscribed to some of the #tags you used get notified of your publication
  5. because it provokes some insights in you, you comment back in the system, which notifies other people that the initial blog post is gaining traction. Other people comment as well, or write their own blog posts which get connected to yours in the system…

So, there’s a virtuous circle: you blog, it gets tweeted, people receive it through their #tags subscription, they react and post some more, which get tweeted as well, etc.

This is what (the now defunct) Google Wave ought to become IMO. Only that I removed the constraint of requiring bloggers to belong to Wave or some dedicated blog platform.

 

Reblog: Forget Empowerment—Aim for Exhilaration | Management Innovation eXchange

April 30th, 2012 Posted in Uncategorized Tags: , , ,

This really came at a time where I’m considering writing on this very subject.

Can’t say it better than in this article from Management Innovation eXchange, though, so you’d better read it straight!

Forget Empowerment—Aim for Exhilaration | Management Innovation eXchange.

#Lean is hard on processes in order to be soft on people

October 11th, 2011 Posted in Lean, Uncategorized Tags: , , , ,

After yesterday diatribe on the people side of improvement, it occurred to me this morning that when doing Lean management, what we work with are mainly processes, not people; at least not directly.

“Hard on problems, soft on people” is indeed an often cited quote in Lean culture.

Lean is based on a coaching culture where the coaches are the managers (“teach, don’t tell” is another Lean quote). Yet, you can’t coach someone who doesn’t want to (whatever his/her [good or bad] reason).

So, the process is used as a pretext for that coaching. In an organization that needs to make benefits, improving efficiency is something well understood from employees. Yet, it’s hard (if not impossible) to come toward people and tell them how they should work better, because:

  • it’s disrespectful (and Lean is based on Respect for People!)
  • it’s presumptuous unless you did their job before and preferably not long time ago
  • and even if not long ago, you’d be served a well-merited “why didn’t you do it yourself when on the job”?
  • you don’t have requisite variety, meaning a manager can’t know the details of how to do each and every job he’s supposed to manage
  • and finally, it goes against what Lean management teaches us: having employees learn. If you tell, they don’t learn. Period.

So, even if you know how to do it better, you shouldn’t say it. And so you focus on the processes instead. Because by improving processes, you squeeze problems out of them, which means food for thought for your employees, which they will solve because it’s their job (not yours as a manager!), which will improve further the process and make it all the more sensitive to more subtle problems.

So is the virtuous circle of Lean.

(The vicious circle of traditional management is all too common: no problem solving, thus more problems, more firefighting, less time to solve anything, and more problems, leading to people leaving the company, new hires, less experience of the current situation and so further less problem solving). I wrote about it here: Nobody Ever Gets Credit for Fixing Problems that Never Happened (Creating & Sustaining Process Improvement).

How often do you focus on the processes instead of only the results of them?

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