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The Next Wave: how I see the future of #social #networking & blogging on Internet

February 20th, 2013 Posted in Lean, Uncategorized Tags: , , , , , ,

Somesh CirclesThis is something I’ve been pondering since quite some time.

  • Twitter is too short to make for long discourses, and you have to find people, then subscribe to them (not Lean!)
  • Blogs you have to search for and subscribe (not Lean!)
  • #hashtags are a cool way to mark content (so do categories and tags in blog posts)

So here’s what I have in mind for the next wave of social platforms (see picture on the right). It would basically work as this:

  1. people tell the system of what they are interested in using specific #tags
  2. you post whatever interesting content of some kind of a blogging platform and you categorize and #tag your post with as much as necessary #tags your piece of work mandates
  3. the article gets notified to some system: title, @author, all #tags
  4. people who subscribed to some of the #tags you used get notified of your publication
  5. because it provokes some insights in you, you comment back in the system, which notifies other people that the initial blog post is gaining traction. Other people comment as well, or write their own blog posts which get connected to yours in the system…

So, there’s a virtuous circle: you blog, it gets tweeted, people receive it through their #tags subscription, they react and post some more, which get tweeted as well, etc.

This is what (the now defunct) Google Wave ought to become IMO. Only that I removed the constraint of requiring bloggers to belong to Wave or some dedicated blog platform.

 

BMA Inc – The #Lean #Accounting Leaders : free #mindmap

February 6th, 2013 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , , , ,

Here’s a nice mindmap about Lean Accounting! BMA Inc – The Lean Accounting Leaders – Lean Accounting.

I remembered when I read the “Real numbers” book that it was interesting an subject (although finance is not my topic of choice). Will have to re-read it again, now.

 

 

Ernesto Sirolli: Want to help someone? Shut up and listen! | #Video on @TED

This is the most hilarious, serious and extraordinatry video I’ve seen in quite some time on how to change the world and help people.

Drop whatever you’re doing at the moment, and look at it now (less than 20 minutes).

That video speaks about helping people, listening, entrepreneurship, creating successful organizations, making people thrive, and hippos. Yes, hippos.

To me, Ernesto Sirolli holds the keys to successful Lean turnovers… or whatever else is needed by the people that want to thrive in their lives and work.

Ernesto Sirolli: Want to help someone? Shut up and listen! | Video on TED.com.

 

What Taylor did for the work of the hand, Google is doing for the work of the mind (N. Carr) @LinkedIn. Is this really a problem?

December 7th, 2012 Posted in Change, Lean Tags: , , , ,

Here’s a nice discussion launched on the LinkedIn group “Systems Thinking and Lean for Services”: What Taylor did for the work of the hand, Google is doing for the work of the mind (N. Carr) | LinkedIn.

I make my own contribution which I reiter here, since the group’s closed:

The original english article (from 2008) hasn’t been linked. Here is it:
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/306868/

A remark I just made to myself: we’re changing the way we read, undoubtedly. That we probably are also changing our way of thinking, I can understand it too.

But should it really be viewed as a problem? I mean, if you want to continue to live by thinking the way you thought a few years ago (ie, ‘deeply’), then surely you have a problem. No argument either that deep thinking allowed some fantastic inventions.

But I think there’s an (unspoken) assumption behind the article: that this new zapping way of thinking is worse than the deeper one. Surely the same things can’t probably be achieved using the new way than with the older one.

Yet, again, is it really a problem?

Humans are structurally coupled with their environment (Maturana). Their environment reflects themselves, and this is reflected also in the language they use (and inversely if we agree with the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis – now that I know Systems Thinking, I’d say there’s structural coupling here as well).

So that (new) languaging (Twitter or Facebook short messages), thinking, web surfing, zapping, etc. is the new way life is lived today. Or is going to be lived for years to come (I don’t see it changing soon: ask any teacher for instance about the trends they see).

In the article, Google is assumed to be the equivalent of Taylor. Then I suggest that Tim Berners-Lee was the Ford of Internet (he pulled knowledge online on the web), and now Taylor/Google is organizing it for us. I suspect the Semantic Web will even reinforce that (go think why! 😉

May I remind you that Taiichi Ohno came after Taylor with what was deemed to be known as the Toyota Production System (or Lean, though the latter lacks that Respect for People part, most of the time).

Should we compare the two, I’d say that where Taylor (Google) devised how to work (think), Ohno (? no replacement yet?) devised how to improve that work… without too much deep thinking, instead with constant and continuous improvement of the work.

Where Taylor split the work, Ohno used the small thinking of people to have them improve their small part of the work, then connect the dots (the parts) through A3 thinking and nemawashi (Google these! 😉

I see an enormous advantage in being able to surf knowledge on the web (for instance): it allows to far more rapidly connect concepts and ideas together, which you can only do so slowly when only thinking deep.

So instead of scarce big changes once in a while, we might end up with a flow of continuous small changes and innovations, all the time.

Toyota became the best in manufacturing doing exactly that. Why couldn’t people do the same for their own thinking?

Finding local roots for #Lean – Everywhere (@mbaudin reblog): What about here and there too? #solutionfocus

I found this nice piece of Michel Baudin regarding finding local roots for Lean to improve acceptance of Lean: Finding local roots for Lean – Everywhere | Michel Baudin’s Blog.

But then I wondered about having people “discover” that they already invented some Lean principles themselves? Maybe they just didn’t noticed or maintained them consistently over time?

This is what the Strengh-based approach to Lean is (well, at least using the Solution Focused way).

  • When have you seen this process improving? What did you do that contributed to that improvement? (finding improvements actions that work for the people here; the improvement part of “continuout improvement”)
  • How do you manage actions that you must do repeatedly? (finding ways to remember to to actions all the time; the continuous part of “continuous improvement”)
  • When have your work been easier to do? More interesting? What did you do to help create these conditions? (findings ways to improve the work that work for the people doing it)
  • Tell me about a time where your customers where satisfied with the product or services you delivered. What was it? How did you do it? (same kind of question, but for quality)
  • etc.

 

Using #Scrum, #kanban and #AppreciativeInquiry to Manage #Kaizen? Why not!

I often struggle with management giving only lip service to sustaining kaizen (continuous improvement, the problem being with continuous, not improvements which they heartfully agree to have!).

So I ended up with the strange idea of using a framework to create a culture of improving often and having a clear path forward. When the culture has changed to continuously improve, the framework can probably be ditched for something else (indeed, it should have if they improve their way of improving, see Scrumming the scrum!)

To make the story (!) short, I ended up with using Scrum, an Agile Software Development method, to manage improvements themselves.

I did a quick review of basic Scrum artifacts as per what Wikipedia lists, and it looks nice. The trick is using the team leader or anyone willing to play that role as Scrum Master (though the TL would be best).

Here’s a small file to see what matches to what, though this is quite straightforward: Scrum for Kaizen v1.0 EN.

Of course, if you don’t know Scrum, you’d probably want to have a look to Wikipedia link above and go with one of the introductory files linked such as downloading the Scrum Guide.

How to populate the Product Backlog (list of improvements)? Well, I have another idea: do an Appreciative Inquiry with the team and see what they really want for themselves, then:

  • write the Provocative Propositions from the Destiny phase on top of the Product Backlog
  • dump the result of the Delivery phase in the Product Backlog

and voilà, you have your list of (most and much) desires improvements!

Chances are that your list of AI-based improvements will be big so you might as well use a Kanban to manage all of this… So this is more technically speaking Scrum-ban, but… who cares anyway? 🙂

Someone wants to try it?

#lkfr12 : Strength-based Kanban : slides, interview guide and final handout available!

October 23rd, 2012 Posted in Lean, Strengths Tags: , , , , , ,

This year (2012) was the first edition of Lean Kanban France. David Shaked and myself facilitated a workshop about “strength-based kanban” to be used both as a tool and metaphor to boost one’s own coaching skills (whether to coach Lean or Kanban… or whatever!).

Here are the documents:

  • slides,
  • 1st generation handout (interview guide used for people to interview each other during the workshop)
  • and 2nd generation version of a strength-based kanban which you are encouraged to use, improve

…all the while to keep us informed of what great things you did with it!

Meanwhile, should you like to participate in the strength-based (r)evolution of Lean, feel free to join others on the Strength-Based Lean Six Sigma LinkedIn discussion group.

 

Don’t do #Lean, Build it instead

October 23rd, 2012 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

People read a lot of books to try to know all about Lean. Indeed, I did it myself (and sometimes still do it). And that’s OK.

But then, we try to have others do Lean as we’ve read in the books.

It’s an error.

We ought to have others build a Lean organization, not do it as per the books.

Trying to do Lean is trying to push solutions onto people, which is a sure way to have them resist.

Whether trying to build a Lean organization is about helping people find their own solutions toward Lean. As I say, it’s about pulling Lean out of the people. Not the other way round.

Indeed, Taiichi Ohno told us so: we shouldn’t try to replicate the Toyota Production System, we must grow our own. That’s the main reason he didn’t want to write down what TPS was in the first place (other reason was to avoid it becoming fixed).

Why is it, then, that we try to replicate all that Mr Ohno told, except for this one fundamental, point?

 

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