Appreciating Systems

Appreciating Systems for Genuine Efficiency
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#SystemsThinking Usage survey results of 2013

May 30th, 2014 Posted in Systems Thinking Tags: ,

I missed this one, but the results are interesting : http://fuzzzyblog.blogspot.no/2013/03/systems-thinking-usage-survey-2013.html

I’m puzzled by the top 3 reasons people are not learning about Systems Thinking:

1. Not enough time. Being deep into Time management and productivity, I can safely say this is the worst excuse people are most often giving. People have the time for a zillions different things in their life, like playing with their kids or reading a good old book. Not enough time usually means “I’m not interested enough to give it the required time to learn it”. Duh.

2. Poor quality of learning material. This one is highly subjective, and it mostly depends on the person and the material they find. Yet, when you don’t like something, you often tag it of being inappropriate when in fact you just don’t want to give it the required time. Back to the preceding point it seems. Peter Senge’s Fifth Discipline is an acclaimed book on Systems Thinking (although it tackles only a small aspect of the subject), so there indeed are good materials available. If you don’t want to invest the necessary money (expensive books or courses), chances are you’ll only find lousy material. Definitely back to #1: “I don’t find it interesting enough to invest the necessary money”.

3. ST has no process or framework so it becomes too abstract and philosophical. Quick note: this question was asked on the Systems Thinking World LinkedIn forum and so the debates here are… well often abstract and philosophical. Back to #2 about lousy materials if you don’t invest a minimum of money. When you have a (deep) look at Systems Dynamics, SSM, SODA, CSH, or whatever else Systems Thinking method the group appears to talk of, you’ll find processes and frameworks. Moreover, the way ST is practiced is quite different from causal and linear thinking, ideas often going is many different directions. If you seek in ST what you’re reproaching in classical thinking, you won’t find it. But if you reproach ST what you don’t have in classical thinking, then of course, you won’t like it. This one boils down to me to “this ain’t like what I’m used to, so I don’t like it… so I won’t invest money nor time learning it”.

In coaching, it’s often the case that what a client asks is not what a client wants. It looks like to me we’re in the same case here: don’t ask people what they want in ST, since they don’t know their need or can’t explain it, or can’t see the point in using ST.

That was a very nice survey nonetheless, and the part about people who say of themselves they are systems thinkers is more interesting, IMHO… Go check it 🙂

 

Reblog: Most Workers ?Hate Their Job? (Are Disengaged); #Lean & #Kaizen Can Help

June 25th, 2013 Posted in Lean, Strengths Tags: , , , , ,

Mark Graban wrote an excellent blog post about Gallup’s recent survey of strength usage at work… or lack thereof. Only 30% of people really are engaged at work, which means 70% of them are not engaged or actively disengaged! I’ve seen past reports for other countries (UK and Australia namely) and the results are similar. I haven’t seen results for France, but I guess they would be similar.

Mark’s point is that Lean can help with increasing engagement at work. I would even dare to say that it can make employees thrive and flourish provided it’s done for good reasons (improve work conditions and serve clients better, in this order, then money will follow).

I couldn’t agree more. Read his post here:
http://www.leanblog.org/2013/06/most-workers-hate-their-job-are-disengaged-lean-can-help/

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