Appreciating Systems

Appreciating Systems for Genuine Efficiency
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The 30 elements of customer value via @harvardbiz @alexis8nicolas: what about employee assessment?

Here’s an excellent (as usual) article from Harvard Business Value: https://hbr.org/2016/09/the-elements-of-value. It reveals results from a study about customers not being interested just by Quality, Delays and Costs (as simplified in #Lean), but also by much more different criteria (30 in total):

The question raised by Alexis Nicolas is: Why about using these 30 elements to evaluate the perception of a collaborator about his job and the company he works for during periodic assessments?

The hierarchy is reproduced below, but to make a long story short, we could synthesize the levels with the following reading grid:

  • at the functional level: this corresponds to the traditional employee assessment where his/her contribution is evaluated. Only with much more details;
  • at the emotional level we could assess how the employee feels in his/her job and what are the factors inciting to contributing more than the job description;
  • at a life changing level we can start to identify how the job or the organization is helping the employee grow and whether (or not) it gives reasons for him or her to fight for doing the job;
  • and at the social impact level we can assess whether the employee feels the job as a way to contribute to something bigger than his life, toward the world: that’s what’s is the more motivating for someone and which has the power to turn a job into a life mission.

Thanks Alexis for the mind-blowing question!

R1609C_ALMQUIST_VALUEPYRAMID

Reblog @HarvardBiz : Can You Invent Something New If Your Words Are Old?

A nice post that makes you think: Can You Invent Something New If Your Words Are Old?

Lean is deficit-based in its language: what problem do we need to fix? What failure demand do we need to take care of? What’s the gap between where you are now (bad) and where you want to be (customer need)?

Hopefully, I see the glimpse of positive change here and there:

  • Lean Startup is gaining a lot of traction when it comes to doing just what the customer want but with a constant thrust to find more and more added value, even in the form customer didn’t know they had a need for. Lean startup is also starting to be use elsewhere, like in Lean Change for instance by Jason Little.
  • Strength-Based Lean Six Sigma by David Shaked which specifically addresses this (disclaimer: I reviewed the book). The book is due on November 4th.
  • And of course the usual positive suspects (deficit word, again!): Appreciative Inquiry, Solution Focus, Positive Deviance, and much more.

In my book (“The Colors of Change“), I make the case for strength-based change approaches and explain why we don’t use them naturally (why it’s normal to fail), what can we do instead, and list some of the change approaches that I feel are strength-based and make use of a different language to achieve different (and better!) results.

Using a different language, we can co-construct a different reality, and, experimenting it, we can confirm and reinforce our thinking that this indeed works better. It’s usually better because of the absence of so-called “resistance to change”, learning step, etc.

Don’t try to match reality to your dreams (it will just reinforce the gap).

Don’t try to force your dreams onto reality (you’ll find resistance).

Instead, do search for your dreams in reality. I bet you’ll find them!

Reblog: Increase Your Team’s Motivation Five-Fold – Scott Keller – Harvard Business Review

Well, this is exactly what Appreciative Inquiry or Solution Focus is about. I’m really glad some kind of research has been done to put a number on it. Five times more commitment for a self-designed change vision, when compared to a top-down one.

5IVE

Remember this number!

Conversely, it also means that the current way people see their situation is FIVE times more appealing to them than the change you might propose. Meaning that if you want to impose your ideas, you’ll have FIVE time more work to do to turn them over.

The article states that some company that made “people write their own lottery tickets” took twice the time to do so.

That mean that by investing TWO you get FIVE (a 2,5 investment). Not a bad deal when you know that you are the one that need to invest FIVE otherwise! So, the deal is:

  • Give FIVE or
  • Give TWO and get FIVE.

See original article here: Increase Your Team’s Motivation Five-Fold – Scott Keller – Harvard Business Review.

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