Appreciating Systems

Appreciating Systems for Genuine Efficiency
Home » Posts tagged 'employee'

The 30 elements of customer value via @harvardbiz @alexis8nicolas: what about employee assessment?

Here’s an excellent (as usual) article from Harvard Business Value: https://hbr.org/2016/09/the-elements-of-value. It reveals results from a study about customers not being interested just by Quality, Delays and Costs (as simplified in #Lean), but also by much more different criteria (30 in total):

The question raised by Alexis Nicolas is: Why about using these 30 elements to evaluate the perception of a collaborator about his job and the company he works for during periodic assessments?

The hierarchy is reproduced below, but to make a long story short, we could synthesize the levels with the following reading grid:

  • at the functional level: this corresponds to the traditional employee assessment where his/her contribution is evaluated. Only with much more details;
  • at the emotional level we could assess how the employee feels in his/her job and what are the factors inciting to contributing more than the job description;
  • at a life changing level we can start to identify how the job or the organization is helping the employee grow and whether (or not) it gives reasons for him or her to fight for doing the job;
  • and at the social impact level we can assess whether the employee feels the job as a way to contribute to something bigger than his life, toward the world: that’s what’s is the more motivating for someone and which has the power to turn a job into a life mission.

Thanks Alexis for the mind-blowing question!

R1609C_ALMQUIST_VALUEPYRAMID

Reblog: Metrics in Lean – Alternatives to Rank-and-Yank in Evaluating People | Michel Baudin’s Blog

August 16th, 2012 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , , ,

Here’s a nice article from Michel Baudin about evaluating employees.

Metrics in Lean – Alternatives to Rank-and-Yank in Evaluating People | Michel Baudin’s Blog.

I like most of what’s written there, though I’m still wary of just evaluating. Couldn’t we yank (pun intended) the evaluation process altogether?

My arguments in support of this are that, like Deming said, most problems are process related (being into Systems Thinking, I’d also say that most are system related as well). So, how could you evaluate someone when their individual performance only accounts for 5% in their result?!

I’ve come to know that some companies try to evaluate teams rather than individuals. I see clear benefits from that, though the main drawback being that people can hardly stand out when they would like to. But it might be a matter of adapting to that kind of evaluation and seeking peer recognition rather than management’s. Some of the benefits are:

  • better intra-team collaboration and exchanges
  • fewer competition among team members (which is often detrimental to overall performance)
  • better sense of purpose since people share something and can feel contributing to something bigger than themselves (the team) – a highly motivating factor
  • (gentle?) peer pressure so as not to be caught sky glazing, though I’m not sure this really is a benefit (surely in the eyes of traditional management, but not necessarily in employees’ mind…)

All in all, I have it that a poor performing individual is mainly a management problem:

  • has the employee been hired for the wrong reasons?
  • has the employee been hired on wrong criteria for the job?
  • did management provided adequat support for making that person thrive in his job?
  • did management do his duty so as to keep that person in the job she was hired for?
  • is the person still adapted/willing to do the job she was hired for in the first place? Maybe this is time for her to move elsewhere in the organization… to a place she’s willing to go!
  • etc.

Of course, there are new challenges with taking care of people that way, namely that you can’t just put people where they would like to be if they don’t have the required skills. But you can surely devise a cleaver way of slowly prepare the persons for their new activities. Of the cost involved to do so, you’ll also gain a highly motivated workforce that will fight for their own benefit, which, incidentally, will coincide with that of the organization. Priceless, isn’t it?

Isn’t that a win-win approach to be sought for?

 

Mail List

Join the mailing list

Check your email and confirm the subscription