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@NancyDuarte #resonate #free #book on making presentations: what if you could *really* turn your audience into a hero?

I’m reading the beginning of this great book from Nancy Duarte she just released for free in beautiful HTML 5: Resonate. The book’s (or the beginning of it at least) is about the Monomyth as it’s been described by Joseph Campbell in “A Hero’s Journey”.

The purpose of a presentation should be to tell a story and make your audience like it is the hero of it, by making it visualize “what could be” in comparison to “what is“. The intent is to “sell” your proposal of how to achieve the “what could be” part of your message.

Yet, I’m thinking of all these strength-based approaches to change I’ve learned these recent years. For instance:

  • Appreciative Inquiry could be used to have people remember of personal situations where they lived the opposite of the problem (that is a strongly positive situation, that is, an experience of “what could be”). Combined with the social constructionist principle of AI, this could help people co-create their journey rights when you’re presenting (instead of waiting for the “call to action” to start it at the end of the presentation)
  • Solution Focus is explicitly based on the premise that the Future Perfect has already happened, at least partially,and to find again what behavior supported it at that time that could be amplified and done again.

So, instead of just encouraging your audience to just imagine them being a hero, what about having them remember they’ve already been the hero, and probably more than once?

Indeed, the story has already begun albeit in a masqueraded way. The real threshold would then be to have them commit to it and reveal it to the world.

Instead of holding the mirror where the audience can see itself in, what about giving them the mirror to play with? To discover sides of themselves they’ve never imagined they had? And then let them experiment with it right away?

This, I will ponder. I will continue reading the book, because it’s just excellent so far!

 

Moving Motivators Free Exercise » NOOP.NL @jurgenappelo

November 20th, 2013 Posted in Change, Strength Tags: , , , , , ,

Here’s a nice exercise to check how a change initiative will affect people motivation factors.

I see this as useful in the context of any project (to check and possibly amend before rolling it out), in HR to exchange with people about what motivates them and where they would be more happy & efficient (what opportunities would allow them to raise their motivation factors?). The possibilities are endless!

Moving Motivators Free Exercise » NOOP.NL.

Reblog @HarvardBiz : Can You Invent Something New If Your Words Are Old?

A nice post that makes you think: Can You Invent Something New If Your Words Are Old?

Lean is deficit-based in its language: what problem do we need to fix? What failure demand do we need to take care of? What’s the gap between where you are now (bad) and where you want to be (customer need)?

Hopefully, I see the glimpse of positive change here and there:

  • Lean Startup is gaining a lot of traction when it comes to doing just what the customer want but with a constant thrust to find more and more added value, even in the form customer didn’t know they had a need for. Lean startup is also starting to be use elsewhere, like in Lean Change for instance by Jason Little.
  • Strength-Based Lean Six Sigma by David Shaked which specifically addresses this (disclaimer: I reviewed the book). The book is due on November 4th.
  • And of course the usual positive suspects (deficit word, again!): Appreciative Inquiry, Solution Focus, Positive Deviance, and much more.

In my book (“The Colors of Change“), I make the case for strength-based change approaches and explain why we don’t use them naturally (why it’s normal to fail), what can we do instead, and list some of the change approaches that I feel are strength-based and make use of a different language to achieve different (and better!) results.

Using a different language, we can co-construct a different reality, and, experimenting it, we can confirm and reinforce our thinking that this indeed works better. It’s usually better because of the absence of so-called “resistance to change”, learning step, etc.

Don’t try to match reality to your dreams (it will just reinforce the gap).

Don’t try to force your dreams onto reality (you’ll find resistance).

Instead, do search for your dreams in reality. I bet you’ll find them!

Reblog: The Big Blindspot of Every Culture-Maker: How to Go From “Outsider” to “Insider” « Get Storied #storytelling

October 14th, 2013 Posted in Change, The Colors of Change Tags: , , , ,

Funnily, I wanted to write my own Hero’s (internal) journey, and this is prcisely when I am stuck now. Hopefully, what I’ve been seeking (and found) was precisely how to do that connection with people that were lost before.

The key to my return is precisely what I have found (that weren’t really lost anyway, just hidden in plain sight).

The Big Blindspot of Every Culture-Maker: How to Go From “Outsider” to “Insider” « Get Storied: Change Your Story. Change Your World.

Read the post above, then you might want to check what I’m talking about: The Colors of Change, my currently-being-written book.

A proposal for a new #Complexity- and #Strength- based #PDCA (for #Lean or else)

Thinking during commute the other day (should I have to live nearer my work, I’d be much more dumb!) I pondered how a better strength-based Plan Do Check Act loop could look like.

I find the current version of PDCA to be a bit too deficit-based and tainted of Command & Control. All too often we see managers or project managers deciding on a plan in their offices and rolling it over employees, without much consideration about what would work for them (they’re the ones with their two feet in the daily work, so they should know best). Sure, if you’re doing nemawashi, this doesn’t concern you. But not everybody does it, yet.

So, since we’re speaking more and more about complexity (hmmm, Google Trends on complexity is making me a liar it seems – a construction of mine?)… anyway, I came up with the following new version:

  • Connect ideas of different people: who are they? what are their strengths? What ideas do they have? Aspirations? Opportunities they see? Results they expect?
  • Select ideas that you (collectively) would think are the more interesting to try?
  • Effect these ideas: go to the gemba and put them to the test of work. Measure heavily what happens of course (People side: does it enhance the work experience? Quality? Delays? Costs?)
  • Reflect on what happened: what did you learn? What new opportunities do you now see? What hopes does this give you? What else?

PS: well, at least the Cynefin  framework is trending more 😉

Silver Linings: #PositiveDeviance, #AppreciativeInquiry | Thunderhead Works

Dan Heath (who co-wrote “Switch: how to change things when change is hard“) talks about focusing on the positive rather than the negative here: Silver Linings: Positive Deviance, Appreciative Inquiry | Thunderhead Works.

This also is the topic of my own book “The Colors of Change” that currently under writing but for which you can download the first chapters. In it I explain why it is that we do that wrong step of digging into problems (hint: this is natural to how the brain is wired), and what should be done instead, and how.

 

Revue du livre “La pratique du #Lean Management dans l’IT”

April 5th, 2013 Posted in Change, Lean Tags: , , , ,

J’ai lu avec beaucoup d’intérêt le livre collectif “La pratique du Lean Management dans l’IT“.

Travaillant moi-même dans l’IT et le Lean, je connais plusieurs versions de ce qu’on appelle “le Lean”, et dans l’IT, tout ne se passe pas toujours très bien (ne me lancez pas sur les causes profondes de ces échecs, j’en aurai pour des heures!)

Ce livre, sans être une bible de référence sur le sujet (ce que les auteurs n’avaient je pense pas l’intention de faire), démontre comment il est :

  1. facile de faire du Lean dans l’IT ;
  2. possible d’obtenir rapidement d’impressionnants résultats ;
  3. possible de placer et conserver les gens au centre de la démarche.

En effet, beaucoup de démarches déploient une forme de Lean en mode “command & control” ce qui d’une part est une hérésie en matière de gestion du changement et d’autre part n’est tout simplement pas du Lean.

Point de tout cela ici. Le livre est très clair sur les manières de faire, limpides sur les raisons de faire ce qui a été fait, et les histoires rapportées (nombreuses et éclairantes) apportent un vrai plus.

Relativement court, le livre devrait permettre à tout bon manager IT de se décider à se lancer dans le Lean management, pour peu qu’il veuille bien aider ses collaborateurs à sortir des difficultés dans lesquelles le système les a enfermés au fil du temps…

Un must à lire !

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