Appreciating Systems

Appreciating Systems for Genuine Efficiency
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Reblog: An Industrial-Age Solution To Email Overload | @FastCompany

February 9th, 2016 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , , , ,

This is a very interesting article indeed. Now, that’s not as if Lean or Agile practitioners wouldn’t shield workers and developers from incessant perturbations. We know that already, albeit we’re only practicing it for certain categories of workers (line workers or developers for instance), and not for the rest of the organization.

When you’re going for optimization, do it to the whole value chain, not just where value is added. And while you’re at it, remove that which doesn’t bring value at all. Hint: there’s a hell lot of stuff that might qualify as “work” but which is not adding value to your customers. It’s most probably bugging your employees and destroying their engagement.

A century ago, the Pullman Company came up with an ingenious solution to help brass workers do their jobs without distraction.

Source: An Industrial-Age Solution To Email Overload | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

An Introduction to Cost of Delay -LeadingAgile #CD3 #agile

June 12th, 2015 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , ,

Surprisingly, doing the most valuable feature first is not always the best economic decision. Don’t forget to limit your cost of delay in your portfolio.

Source: An Introduction to Cost of Delay -LeadingAgile

Excellent article: simple, clear, straight to the point. I wonder if I can introduce that in IT Operations? I mean, theoretically, yes of course. But practically… hmm.

 

#NoProjects – why projects (in IT) don’t make sense via @allankellynet

July 9th, 2014 Posted in Change Tags: , , , , ,

I just stumbled upon this marvelous piece of read: Why projects don’t make sense.

Just spot on, I love this!

Moreover, when Allan says

Destroying team destroys knowledge – knowledge has value, knowledge exists in heads not documents

I would further add that knowledge exists in the interactions too (social constructionism). Destroy relationships, destroy knowledge.

Stop Using Story Points | Industrial Logic (#agile, #Lean@

April 16th, 2013 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , ,

Joshua Kerievsky has written a really nice and comprehensive article on Agile and the usage (abuse) of story points: Stop Using Story Points | Industrial Logic.

I always felt like Agile (or Kanban) felt in love with their tools and didn’t use them for continuous improvement past the obvious. I mean, you have those that just use the tool to manage work and don’t improve (they usually don’t do review at the end of the sprint). Then there are those that, while doing the review, would work at removing the blocks of the sprint and ensure next sprint won’t suffer the same problems. And it usually stops here.

The real point of Agile (or Lean for that purpose) should always IMHO have been to constantly work at reducing the delay between the moment a client requests a feature and the moment it is used successfully. So the review should have been used for more than just removing obvious roadblocks.

So I’m pleased the story points are gone for the most advanced agile practitioners (they would probably continue to be useful for beginners, I just hope people will feel less sticky with them).

But now my concern is whether the story point less teams will continue doing reviews and:

  • seeing their process together
  • solving problems /improving together
  • learning together

I look forward to what new will happen in the Agile world. Great job so far anyway!

 

Doing #Agile retrospectives with #AppreciativeInquiry

I’ve just stumbled upon a very nice article about doing “Appreciatives Restrospectives” at the end of an agile sprint: An Appreciative Retrospective | AYE Conference.

Could that be used during a Lean morning meeting when by changing the focus from problems to what worked (and capitalize on it through standardization)?

 

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