Appreciating Systems

Appreciating Systems for Genuine Efficiency
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What’s your best #book about #strategy deployment / #hoshin #kanri in #Lean?

March 18th, 2014 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , , ,

The topic says it all. I’ve read (but someone lost it 😉 Pascal Dennis’ “Getting the Right Things Done” and loved it at the time. But before I order the book again, I wondered if there wouldn’t be others worth considering (given that I still remember most of it)?

I did have a quick look a few years ago in “Hoshin Kanri for the Lean Enterprise” by Thomas L. Jackson, but it seemed a bit complicated at the time. But I will welcome any opposing arguments!

Please provide hints in comments below (or through Twitter at @nicolasstampf). Thank you very much!

 

Glass in half – A #strength-based #Lean perspective compared to other mental models…

March 11th, 2014 Posted in Lean, Strength Tags: , , ,

Someone just posted this on LinkedIn and I thought I might add my own vision of it (I don’t have the original from LeanPost):

half glass

 

 

 

This cartoon lacks a fourth picture, that of the strength-based Lean thinker (besides, does someone around here remember that Lean is indeed a business model [that is, to create value!], and not a cost-cutting program?!)

Woohoo, we already know how to fill half of the glass, and guess what, we still have room to have twice of it. We can do more!

The paradox of improvement and #change in a #deficit or #strength-based vision of the world…

I was considering change this morning, in the context of how the brain, as a complex adaptive system, deals with it (this is explained in my book “The Colors of Change“).

When you work from a deficit-based perspective on life (that is, you have a vision or an ideal in mind and all you see are gaps between it and reality around you, that is, problems):

It’s easy to point out problems, but it’s difficult to solve them.

It’s difficult because you will want to fill a gap using things absent. Which is difficult obviously.

On the contrary, when working from a strength-based mindset, the situation is just the opposite:

It’s hard to point out strengths, but it’s easy to improve on them.

Because strengths are so easy to use, they are hardly noticed on first sight, especially by the person expressing them. For others, it’s a bit easier because someone’s strengths might look so different to one’s own mental model that singling them out is easy.

As for improving, well, the person exercising a strength needs to notice it first before being able to do more of it. But once it’s made visible again (using a slight shift in perspective, for instance), then it’s far easier to do more of it, because you know exactly what it is: you’re going to do more of something you already have done before. Compare this to doing something you never did or for which you’re not so good at!

As far as efficiency is concerned, I’d rather think a bit more beforehand to understand the strengths at play, and then act more easily afterwards, rather than the opposite (jumping straight on a problem but being dragged in acting out a solution to it).

Of course, there’s the middle path where you identify a problem, and then work out to find times when the problem was not present, what the corresponding strengths might be that made the situation better, and then do more of them. A bit simpler than strict problem solving, though still longer than pure strength-based work.

So what? Well, my conclusion is to just don’t damn look for problems in the first place. Just identify what you want more of because you just seem to like it, identify how come you’re good at it, and just-do-more-of-it!!!

 

#AppreciativeInquiry Summit for 750 — Profound Conversations

Neil facilitated an AI Summit for 750. His short report of it is really exciting! I wish I could organize one like that here.

I love this:

We had one ground rule: “Everyone is a fully functioning adult making informed choices about how to participate.”

Please continue!

 

#Lean and @simonsinek’s Golden Circle : there’s hope for you, yet…

February 24th, 2014 Posted in Lean Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

I had a sort of epiphany this morning during commute.

Lean isn’t, or shouldn’t, be transmitted or taught about improving performance or best to achieve performance.

The recent history of Lean seems to me to have gone through the following steps, which, in my mind, mirror the approaching of the WHY center circle of Simon Sinek.

Whats of Lean were the first to be taught (probably because they were the easiest to spot and understand inside Toyota plants) – and is still probably the main line of teaching Lean. Incidentally, these were those Taiichi Ohno warned us against:

  • Results: is orientated toward increasing performance of the company
  • Teaching of Lean: based mostly on using tools

Hows of Lean saw the beginning of a change in how Lean is transmitted:

  • Results: are sought through people and therefore “Respect” comes again to the fore (which it should never have left anyway)
  • Teaching of Lean: centered on how you achieve results (through people), that solutions come from them, not from the sensei. I think the epitome for this is the great “Toyota Kata” approach to teach Lean from Mike Rother.

Whys of Lean is when executives understand there’s really something more to improving a company, and that “respect for people” really is meant for more than mere words:

  • Results: are about contributing to something bigger than the company
  • Teaching of Lean: Lean is about making people flourish both inside and outside the company

Funnily, the more you advance in how you see Lean (according to the preceding three steps), the less you speak about Lean stuff and more about personal and organizational purpose.

Of course, I can’t end this post without this famous quote from Antoine de Saint-ExupĂ©ry:

If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.

Simon, I bow before you…

#Lean Six Sigma est mort – vive le #Strength-Based Lean Six Sigma ! | @alexis8nicolas & @davidshaked1

Alexis Nicolas teste le marchĂ© pour une formation Lean Six Sigma fondĂ© sur les forces (strengths). Si vous ĂȘtes intĂ©ressĂ©s, allez voir lĂ  ! Lean Six Sigma est mort – vive le Strength-Based Lean Six Sigma ! | YisY.

 

Articles @LesEchos : GĂ©nĂ©ration Y, les 5 rĂ©volutions de l’entreprise

My Twitter Social Ego Networks

David R. via Compfight

Je viens de lire cet article trĂšs intĂ©ressants sur Les Echos : GĂ©nĂ©ration Y, les 5 rĂ©volutions de l’entreprise.

Je suis globalement d’accord avec le contenu. Mais j’ai l’impression que les entreprises actuelles encore 1.0 ont dĂ©jĂ  perdu. L’avĂšnement des smartphones et les applications sociales a dĂ©jĂ  cassĂ© les frontiĂšres de l’entreprise. Avant, l’espace interne d’une organisation Ă©tait plus ou moins protĂ©gĂ© de l’extĂ©rieur, une sorte de sanctuaire oĂč pouvait se passer plein de choses sans qu’elles soient dĂ©rangĂ©es.

C’est maintenant fini. Nos smartphones nous rappellent sans cesse Ă  ce qu’il se fait dehors, aux opportunitĂ©s existantes ailleurs, Ă  nos amis, Ă  notre famille, etc. Seule une petite partie de notre esprit est concentrĂ©e sur l’interne d’une entreprise.

Si les entreprises n’embrassent pas maintenant cette ouverture en utilisant les mĂȘmes fonctionnements sociaux (intelligence collective, travail collaboratif massif, encouragement Ă  la co-crĂ©ation entre ce qu’elle est et les potentialitĂ©s de ses collaborateurs, …) elle risque de pĂ©ricliter.

Au lieu de laisser l’Ă©nergie de ses collaborateurs se disperser dans les rĂ©seaux sociaux (technologiques ou non !) l’entreprise se doit d’ĂȘtre le lieu oĂč ces Ă©nergies pourront au contraire se connecter et aboutir Ă  quelque chose qui lui soit utile (et Ă©videmment utile aux collaborateurs, l’exploitation sauvage, c’est aussi fini, ça).

On n’embauche plus une personne, on embauche son rĂ©seau social. Que fait-on pour valoriser cela? S’il y a des “fuites sociales” vers l’extĂ©rieur, c’est que l’attrait de l’intĂ©rieur est insuffisant. Et si les gens sont attirĂ©s par le social, alors il faut faire du rĂ©seau social de maniĂšre encore plus intensive Ă  l’intĂ©rieur, pour inverser le flux !

Quelle démarche active avez-vous dans votre entreprise pour connecter les cerveaux sociaux de vos collaborateurs?

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